Friday, December 02, 2016 ... Français/Deutsch/Español/Česky/Japanese/Related posts from blogosphere

Einstein's boxes: measurements don't occur "spontaneously"

Florin Moldoveanu discusses a thought experiment – but be sure that it may be turned into a real experiment – called "Einstein's box" (although it's not "the" famous Einstein's box setup from the Bohr-Einstein debates).

Are Einstein's Boxes an argument for nonlocality?
It seems unbelievable that an undergraduate problem that is so rudimentary is being "solved" incorrectly by the author of a book on foundations quantum mechanics as well as Moldoveanu himself.

The problem is the following: A quantum mechanical particle is located in a box. The wave function \(\psi(x,y,z)\) isn't specified and both men pretend that they don't need to talk about it at all. But let's suppose that it's the ground state of a potential well – a wave function that is real and positive inside, e.g.\[

\sin x \cdot \sin y \cdot \sin z

\] assuming that the box is defined by \(\{x,y,z\}\in (0,\pi)\). Now, a barrier is inserted in the middle of the box, e.g. at \(x=\pi/2\) in my conventions. The question is what is the wave function after this insertion and whether the wave function loses the ability to interfere – loses the information about the relative phase of the part of the wave function in the \(x\lt \pi/2\) "B1" half-box and in the \(x\gt \pi/2\) "B2" half-box.

Thursday, December 01, 2016 ... Français/Deutsch/Español/Česky/Japanese/Related posts from blogosphere

Brainwashed millennials pose a threat to democracy

Indoctrination by Soros-distorted institutions is a primary culprit

The New York Times has published a highly disturbing graph developed over the years by Harvard's government scholar Dr Yascha Mounk:



It shows that the percentage of the people who think that it's "essential" to live in democracy is basically an increasing function of age. In the most extreme cases, while it reaches almost 80% for some of the oldest generations in some countries, it drops as low 19 percent for the millennials or Generation Y – the young folks born around 2000 plus minus 5 years or so.

Wednesday, November 30, 2016 ... Français/Deutsch/Español/Česky/Japanese/Related posts from blogosphere

Clash of interests: Trump vs Babiš

Our Slovak-born finance minister, Andrej Babiš, is a billionaire whose net worth is some $3 billion. The U.S. president-elect is a billionaire whose net worth is about $3.7 billion. Both of them have had Czech partners. None of them is a real intellectual, both of them speak a kind of language that many ordinary people understand. Both of them have become rich in industries that are not exactly hi-tech and practical man's skills and common sense were their main weapons to do so. It's unavoidable that people tend to compare such people.


Well, there are some differences, too.

Donald Trump has never been a member of the communist party or the communist secret police. His father Fred Trump wasn't a communist, either, and they haven't disinherited an uncle for his emigration to the West. Donald Trump hasn't written a tweet "I really don't support Trump despite the comparisons". Donald Trump isn't preparing a scheme that would allow him to monitor all payments in hotels and restaurants in real time starting from tomorrow.

(I wonder: Is some generous soul searching Google for words "order DDoS" and paying some $25 per hour for one hour of DDoS attack against fs.mfcr.cz and/or prod.eet.cz tomorrow? To make the evil scheme collapse and be abandoned? Hundreds of thousands of Czechs would really appreciate it. This paragraph is pure information, not my cooperation with a generous soul. I can't even think about any cooperation with anything like that. Also note that tomorrow, all restaurants in Czechia will be 10% more expensive in average.)

Tuesday, November 29, 2016 ... Français/Deutsch/Español/Česky/Japanese/Related posts from blogosphere

Would you use a nuclear waste diamond battery in your smartphone?

University of Bristol, U.K., published an inspiring press release a few days ago,

‘Diamond-age’ of power generation as nuclear batteries developed
And they added the following video yesterday:



Graphite blocks are used to moderate reactions in nuclear reactors. If you study what's happening with them, you will find out that some of the ordinary carbon-12 in these blocks is turning into the radioactive carbon-14, especially on the surface of these blocks.

Monday, November 28, 2016 ... Français/Deutsch/Español/Česky/Japanese/Related posts from blogosphere

Three papers on information in quantum gravity

I want to briefly mention three recent papers on the fate of the information in quantum gravity.

First, a week ago, Raphael Bousso argued that there is a simple

Universal Limit on Communication.
When you are sending the information by photons, one photon of frequency \(\omega\) must occupy the time at least \(\Delta t \sim 1/ \omega\) and transmits \(\O(1)\) nats (or bits) of information, e.g. a bit from the polarization of the photon. The energy of the photon is \(E=\hbar\omega\).

You might think that the number of bits per photon may be increased arbitrarily because the information may be carried e.g. in the precisely determined angular direction of the photon's motion. But Raphael argues that due to the unavoidable appearance of some quantum effects that are there despite the seemingly classical setup, the recipient of the information (whose name is Bob and who surrounds the source, Alice, by a big sphere) will actually not be able to extract much more information, and the total transmitted information can't be above \(E \cdot \Delta t / \hbar\), after all.

There have been various limits involving the information and entropy etc. Some of them seem to be universal in quantum mechanics, not just results in quantum gravity. This bound doesn't explicitly depend on Newton's constant \(G_N\) and even though the "cultural context" of the derivation seems like quantum gravity (just like some Bekenstein-related bounds), I think it's right to say that this is a non-gravitational result (if it is true).

Swiss voters chose to keep nuclear power plants

I generally think that frequent referendums aren't a good way to organize societies – or at least nations such as mine – because I do think that detailed decisions should be made by selected people with special knowledge and skills and the median voter isn't one of them. That's why a competition between "potential experts" – politicians who fight against each other – which is judged by the median voter i.e. the representative democracy sounds like a more sophisticated scheme.

On the other hand, I am repeatedly impressed by the results of the referendums in Switzerland and the political maturity that they display. Almost one thousand years of referendums could have made the Swiss more sensible. One shouldn't denounce the possible explanation that the Swiss are simply better at this business – and what could be harmful to other nations may be beneficial for Switzerland.

The latest referendum was one about the nuclear energy.

Sunday, November 27, 2016 ... Français/Deutsch/Español/Česky/Japanese/Related posts from blogosphere

Was Hillary defeated by Kremlin-paid propaganda agents?

I used to consider The Washington Post as a daily that an average intelligent person could see as one of his information sources. But this picture was diminishing over the years and three days ago, it dropped hugely because of the article

Russian propaganda effort helped spread ‘fake news’ during election, experts say
In this most viewed article on WaPo's site on Friday, Craig Timberg teaches us that Donald Trump didn't win because of his personality, his program, his campaign strategy, preferences and values of a majority of the U.S. public, and their genuine dissatisfaction with the trends that America has been following in recent years. Instead, Hillary was partly if not mainly defeated by
Russia’s increasingly sophisticated propaganda machinery — including thousands of botnets, teams of paid human “trolls,” and networks of websites and social-media accounts...
Wow, just wow. See some reactions at 21stCenturyWire, ZeroHedge, Truth Feed, The Intercept, Fortune, RT video, RT text, and others, more.

Saturday, November 26, 2016 ... Français/Deutsch/Español/Česky/Japanese/Related posts from blogosphere

Fidel and Czechoslovakia

90 years is a blessed age to die and the Cuban Marxist leader was fortunate to live that long. Donald Trump just tweeted that Castro is dead. Almost all Cubans in Florida are celebrating. They're obviously right about the overall sign of the sentiment. He was a dictator that was responsible for many crippled lives and the erasure of some 90% of the Cuban GDP. But in some way, it doesn't sound "cool" to celebrate the death of this no longer dangerous "hip" character from the world history.



My country had a special relationship to Castro. Like other kids in the Soviet bloc, we were trained to recognize him as a hero. But the relationships were more special. For example, a very large percentage of the machinery used in Cuba was produced in Czechoslovakia. Among many other things, that included a car owned by Fidel, Tatra 603, typically a car of the Czechoslovak VIP communists. At some moment, he switched from Tatra and Soviet limousines to Mercedeses, however.

In 1968, Castro needed to improve his bad relationships with Moscow so he – unlike the Romanian, Yugoslav, Albanian, and Chinese comrades – endorsed the occupation of Czechoslovakia even though he didn't send any actual tanks. For this attitude, Cuba was allowed to export sugar or something like that.

Friday, November 25, 2016 ... Français/Deutsch/Español/Česky/Japanese/Related posts from blogosphere

Turkey updated its position to full blackmail

I hope that the U.S. readers have enjoyed their Thanksgiving. Turkey seems like a natural topic these days.



I am not a fan of Daniel Landa and it seems right to classify his singing as out-of-tune (plus plain talk) but this well-known Czech song is titled "Thanksgiving" so it may get the right to look for fans outside Czechia. Music: Petr Hapka. Lyrics: Michal Horáček, Prague Café's presidential candidate.

For some years, I have observed that Turkey was a problematic ally that Europe shouldn't rely upon, and I have criticized Turkey's relationships with ISIS vs the Kurds, among other things.

Thursday, November 24, 2016 ... Français/Deutsch/Español/Česky/Japanese/Related posts from blogosphere

"Popular vote" and "number of electoral votes" don't commute

I have dedicated several blog posts to the attitude of Trump critics to the elections. The biased media coverage and polls (yesterday, during a public debate in the bank, I noticed how much the anti-Trump and similar self-evidently unjustified biases are widespread even among top bank analysts etc.) and the emotionally immature reactions by the leftists were given some room.

But there's another unsurprising dimension of the leftists' denial of their loss: attacks on the mathematics. While Scott Aaronson sent thousands of dollars to sponsor a recount in three states (WI, MI, PA; leftists' dealing with the taxpayer money is even more wasteful when they get in front of the steering wheel), Brian Greene included himself among the embarrassingly sore losers by questioning the U.S. democracy itself:


Well, that's a painful tweet, Brian, one that shows how sick political positions are considered normal in the Western universities.

I have tried to explain to him that "democracy" generally means "the participation of the most general public at power" but the detailed implementation of this general concept requires additional laws and the U.S. implementation involves the electoral votes. There's nothing non-democratic about this recipe: the "demos" still rules by picking a sensible number of electoral votes etc. During the presidential elections, the U.S. democracy is defined by the rules involving the electoral votes. The rules involving the electoral votes aren't a "curious" flavor of democracy but the "U.S." flavor of democracy, perhaps the world's most celebrated flavor of democracy.

Leftists are used to bending and twisting the rules whenever they can (also changing the rules during the game) – e.g. when they are selectively hiring women or people of color or other privileged groups at the U.S. universities or when they harass conservatives in the Academia – and they seem to be shocked that the same dirty tricks can't be easily done after the presidential elections.

Wednesday, November 23, 2016 ... Français/Deutsch/Español/Česky/Japanese/Related posts from blogosphere

Stupidity of the pop science consensus about "many worlds"

I have criticized a PBS Spacetime video about the quantum erasers before.



But this one-month-old program about the "many worlds" is perhaps even more typical for what I have called the "pop science consensus" about the "interpretations" of quantum mechanics. You can find this garbage virtually everywhere, the creators of this garbage are copying it from each other. Most of the sentences in the video are either downright wrong or at least seriously misleading.

The weird rules of the subatomic world are very different from the laws of the large Universe.
When one is careful, this is just a correct sentence. But those people are never careful so it's obvious that they actually say lots of wrong things in between the lines.

One of them is, as we will see momentarily, that the laws of quantum mechanics do not apply in the large Universe. But they do. The laws of quantum mechanics apply everywhere in the Universe. It's just that in the context of large objects, the laws of classical physics also apply – albeit just approximately. But the laws of quantum mechanics never cease to apply. The relationship between classical and quantum theories is fully analogous to the relationship between non-relativistic and relativistic physics: in both cases, the older theory is a limit, either \(1/c\to 0\) or \(\hbar\to 0\) limit, of the newer theory. But the newer theory is always right, even at arbitrarily low speeds or for arbitrarily large objects.

The video – and equivalent films, books, newspaper articles etc. – contain a huge number of places that make it clear that their authors just don't understand that quantum mechanics applies everywhere in the Universe.

Also, the laws of quantum mechanics aren't really "weird". They're as non-weird as the world around us because they exactly agree with everything we know about the world around us.

Minister proposes an EET exemption for e-shops now

Timing, wording, volatility are testimonies of the staggering incompetence

Today, eight days before the start of the online monitoring of all cash payments on the Czech territory by the ministry of finance (initially in the restaurant+hotel industry), the so-called EET, the main mastermind of the campaign, finance minister and billionaire Andrej Babiš, decided that the critics who said that EET would be particularly insane for e-shops were right, after all. He will propose "his" ingenious improvement of EET to the government – an exemption for e-shops. At least that's what he told a server named info.cz.

While the simple slogan defining EET is that it wants to online supervise all cash payments (officially to fight tax evasion but no intelligent person takes this justification seriously), for certain reasons, the plan has always been to monitor all payments except for regular bank transfers. That meant that all payments by credit/debit cards, PayPal etc. had to be supplemented with extra software that "reports" all these payments to the finance ministry in real time, receives two codes for the transaction, and demands that the consumer is given a receipt with these (very long) codes (FIK, BKP) calculated by the servers of the finance ministry.

Monday, November 21, 2016 ... Français/Deutsch/Español/Česky/Japanese/Related posts from blogosphere

EM drive: a new wave of hype

"EM drive" is one of the names for the physically impossible gadgets that violate the third Newton's law. They're able to move without pushing anything else in the opposite direction which is why they can't exist.

People who don't understand basic physics are obsessed with such a gadget. The meme has been around for a long time. On this blog, I wrote about a wave of EM drive hype in early May 2015 and the NASA denouncement a week later.

The hype is back – dozens of writers bring us the gospel about the "proof" of a physics-defying, impossible gadget. It's been "peer-reviewed" so it must be true – and the letters "NASA" can be found on the first page of the paper.

Franz Joseph I: 100th anniversary of death

First, a physics anniversary. Abdus Salam – see a TRF biography – died exactly 20 years ago, i.e. exactly 80 years after Franz Joseph I. He remains the only Muslim Nobel prize winner in physics (there are 2 in chemistry, 2 in literature, and 7 in peace). He's done a lot for the Pakistani physical sciences, his nation's pride, for the Standard Model but also co-fathered the Pati-Salam grand-non-unified models later. He's been a great scholar – even when it came to the English and Urdu literature. I think that he's also a proof that already in the mid 20th century, ingenious folks from poorer countries had an easy access to the top Western scholarly institutions.



Tonight, it will be exactly 100 years from the moment when our former ruler Franz Joseph I of Austria died in his Schönnbrunn Palace, Vienna, at the same place where he was born 86 years earlier, in 1830.

Around 9 pm, he asked his servants to wake him up at 3:30 am in the following morning, just like they did on that day. Because of so much work, he had no time to be ill, everyone believed him just days earlier. However, his fever surpassed 38 °C due to pneumonia, he died at 9:05 pm, and the imperial office had to report that "her majesty of death has touched Austria-Hungary with her firm hand" and an avalanche of obituaries was started. Check the sorrow of his loyal fans in Arkansas. ;-)



It's not bad to live for 86 years but the duration of his tenure is even more striking. He has been the emperor for 68 years – the equivalent of 17 four-year terms. Which U.S. president can boast about the same survival skills?